Burford, Channel Island Registrations and Brexit

Firstly lets talk about Burford Capital (BUR). Tom Winnifrith, who has been complaining about the accounts and other issues at that company for a long time, sent a letter of complaint to the FCA and FRC (the Financial Reporting Council) asking them to investigate the allegations of Muddy Waters. The FRC have responded with this comment: “Burford Capital is incorporated under the Companies (Guernsey) Law 2008 and is accordingly not subject to the requirements of the Companies Act 2006”. They also said that the shares are traded on AIM which is not a regulated market. The FRC’s Corporate Reporting Review Team therefore does not have powers to make enquiries about the matters raised.

In summary, although the FCA and the FRC have some powers relating to the company’s directors and its auditor, Mr Winnifrith will have to complain to the Guernsey Financial Services Commission who are the regulatory authority.

As I said in my recently published book, company domicile does matter and is definitely worth checking before investing in a company. I specifically said: “In general for UK listed companies, any domicile outside the UK adds to the risk of investing in a company. Domicile in the Channel Islands or Isle of Man is also not ideal [see Chapter 7]”. So that’s yet another reason why I would not have invested in Burford, apart from my doubts about the prudence of their accounting.

Brexit

At the risk of offending half (approximately) of my readers, here are a few comments on the latest political situation and the prorogation of Parliament. Speaker John Bercow has said that “shutting down parliament would be an offence against the democratic process and the rights of parliamentarians….” while there was an editorial in the Financial Times today that said “it was an affront to democracy” and that Mr Johnson had “detonated a bomb under the constitutional apparatus of the United Kingdom”. But I tend to side with Leader of the House Jacob Rees-Mogg who called it “completely constitutional and proper”. Suspension after a near record long parliamentary session to allow the Government to put forward its programme in a new Queen’s Speech is entirely appropriate and not unusual. There is also time before the suspension, and after, for Parliament to debate whatever they want before Brexit date on October 31st. Also Parliament is often closed down in September for the party conferences so this is not unusual.

It’s simply a case of sour grapes from remainers who realise they may not be able to stop Brexit or cause further trouble in resolving the impasse in Parliament. John Bercow is particularly to be criticised because he is supposed to be independent and should not be making such comments on a well-established procedure supported by precedent.

Parliament has been debating Brexit for many months and it is time to draw such debates to a conclusion because it gives the false hope to the EU that the UK will change its mind over leaving. The UK voted to leave and we should get on it with, preferably with some kind of Withdrawal Agreement, or otherwise none. Business is damaged by the on-going uncertainty which is why the pound has been falling. Boris Johnson is simply forcing the pace which is quite right.

If the opposition parties or remainers in the Conservative party do not like what is happening they can call for a vote of no confidence. It that was passed then a general election would no doubt be called, which the Conservatives might actually win, or the election might take place after the Brexit date which would put the remainers in a very difficult position. That is why they are so clamorous. They simply don’t like the position they find themselves in which has actually been caused by those in Parliament who have wanted to debate the matter endlessly without coming to a conclusion.

There are some possible legal challenges but should, or will, the judiciary interfere in what is happening in Parliament? I don’t think they should and I doubt they will. Are Scottish judges, where one challenge is being heard, really going to attempt to rule on a matter of UK wide importance? This seems unlikely in the extreme.

In summary, I think everyone should calm down and let the matter take its course. Those who are not happy with the turn of events can challenge it in Parliament via their elected representatives if they wish. But Brexit needs to be resolved on Oct 31st, one way or another. Not delayed yet again. There are so many other issues that Parliament needs to deal with that more debate on the matter is simply unacceptable.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

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2 thoughts on “Burford, Channel Island Registrations and Brexit”

  1. Your views on Brexit are so predictable, come what may. Please desist from boring 50% of us with your political views. I much prefer to read your views and comments on investment matters, most of which I find interesting.

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    1. Well if you find my comments so boring, you don’t need to read them. But Brexit is so important to the business community and to the longer term share prices of companies that it would be wrong of me not to comment on it at all, as of course the Financial Times has been doing at length. The About note on this blog clearly states that some political comments may be included.

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