Eddie Stobart Logistics and Reasons to be Fearful

No sooner had I published a book that says investors cannot trust the accounts of companies when making investment decisions (“Business Perspective Investing”) than we have yet another case of dubious financial reporting. The latest example is that of Eddie Stobart Logistics (ESL) which has announced that “the Board is applying a more prudent approach to revenue recognition, re-assessing the recoverability of certain receivables, as well as considering the appropriateness of certain provisions”. CEO Alex Laffey is leaving with immediate effect, profits seem to now be uncertain, the dividend is being reviewed and the shares have been suspended. In other words, it’s one of those shock announcements that undermines investor confidence in company accounts and in the stock market in general.

That follows on from the case of Burford Capital where revenue recognition has also come into question and I personally doubt the accounts are prudent. We seem to be getting about one case per week recently of accounts that are called into question or where significant restatements are required. I may need to revise my book sooner than expected because it contains a list of examples of dubious and fraudulent accounts in companies which is rapidly becoming out of date!

ESL is of course one of Neil Woodford’s largest investment holdings – he holds 22% of the company. Mr Woodford has also suffered from a write down in the value of his holding via Woodford Patient Capital Trust in Industrial Heat due to slow business progress. This is a company focused on “cold fusion” technology. Mr Woodford seems to be adept at picking risky investments of late which is not how he built his former reputation. Even the Sunday Times is now attacking Neil Woodford with an article today headlined “Neil Woodford’s worthless tech bets” which covers his investments in Precision Biopsy and SciFluor Life Sciences and which are now alleged to be almost worthless. I feel it’s going to be a very long time before his reputation recovers.

As regards more wider issues, there was a very good article by Merryn Somerset Webb in Saturday’s Financial Times under the headline “So many reasons to be fearful”. She points out that due to low interest rates making it seem irrelevant how long it might be before exciting companies actually produce returns, value stocks are trading lower relative to growth stocks than they have for 44 years. The pound is also at a 35-year low against the dollar and US stock prices at a 50-year high relative to US GDP.

Bond yields are so low that even in nominal terms they are negative in many parts of Europe. What should investors do? She comes up with some suggestions such as investing in commodities such as gold or silver, or even oil because there is a risk that with Governments running out of options to stimulate their economies, they may start printing money which will drive up inflation.

She also comments on a likely new “cold war” to be fought by the USA and China over trade which will may profoundly affect many of our investments. She argues that the next 30 years may be very different to the last 30.

Altogether an interesting article well worth reading if just to remind ourselves that the world is rapidly changing and that we live in very unusual times.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

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