Johnston Press, TrakM8 and Brexit

Over the weekend, Johnston Press (JPR) was put into administration and immediately sold to a new group of companies controlled by the company’s bondholders. In other words this looks like a typical “pre-pack” administration where a company does not go through a proper administration process with an open sales process but is flogged off to in a fire sale to those who already know the business and see an opportunity to collect a bargain.

Trade creditors will lose their money, shareholders will lose everything and the pension scheme is being dumped – and is likely to need bailing out by the Pension Protection Fund.

One investor in the company who wished to revive the business was Norwegian Mr Ager-Hanssen who on Saturday accused the board of thwarting efforts to turn the group around and a “sham” sales process. He is probably right from my experience of what happens in pre-pack administrations. Pre-pack administrations are an anathema as I have said many times before as they undermine a proper process when a company is in difficulties.

Johnston Press does have some very valuable media titles such as the Scotsman and Yorkshire Post but had managed to accumulate an enormous amount of debt by going on an acquisition spree. It also had a big pension deficit. The company put itself up for sale recently but now states that the offers were insufficient to repay the bonds so the company has concluded the equity is worthless. Or perhaps it was simply an example of where the prospective buyers could see it was cheaper to do it via a pre-pack.

I have never held shares in Johnston Press although I looked at it a few times as a possible “value” play. But high debt is a killer when the market in which a company operates is facing strategic problems. With newspaper circulations dropping, and advertising revenue being impacted by changes to media usage – particularly a move to internet advertising – the company failed to cut its debt rapidly enough while revenue was falling and profits disappeared.

Another disaster area on Friday was AIM-listed Trakm8 (TRAK) whose shares fell by 66% on the day to a new low of 22p. This was after publication of their half-year results and a trading statement. Group revenue fell by 38% and a very large loss was the result. The company provided numerous excuses for this and a very negative short-term outlook. But it suggests the market for the company’s solutions “will be robust in the longer term”. Anyone who believes the latter statement must be an eternal optimist.

I did hold this company’s shares briefly in early 2016 when it was the darling of many private investors and the share price peaked at over 360p but I rapidly became disillusioned with the management. Peculiar acquisitions made subsequently, poor cash flow (rather suggesting profits were a mirage of fancy accounting) and generally over-optimistic statements being issued. Warren Buffett has always emphasised the importance of trust in the management of companies in which he invests, and when I lose trust I sell in short order.

Brexit is a topic one can hardly avoid talking about at present. I gave my personal analysis of the draft withdrawal agreement here (yes I have read it): https://roliscon.blog/2018/11/16/brexit-agreement-is-it-a-fair-deal/ . On reflection it seems to me that Mrs May is attempting to meet the demands of both brexiteers and remainers with a compromise deal that keeps us partly in the EU in many regards. The result is that she has pleased few people – the right wing of her own party, the Labour Party and Jeremy Corbyn who is stirring the pot like mad to gain political advantage, the DUP who May relies on for votes, and many others. Even her cabinet seems split counting only those who remain. The concept of the “chequers” plan might have made some sense, but the detail of the proposed agreement is simply not acceptable to many people. I suggest she needs to reconsider, sooner rather than later.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

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Brexit Agreement – Is it a Fair Deal?

I promised in my last blog post to read all 585 pages of the proposed Brexit agreement before commenting. I got to page 365 before concluding I had got a reasonable understanding of it. The “draft” agreement is certainly one of the longest and most complex documents I have ever read. It reads like a lot of documents that come out of the EU – generally incomprehensible to the layman. Indeed, it could have been written by an EU bureaucrat – perhaps it was.

The agreement covers primarily the immediate withdrawal issues and the two-year transition period, but it actually extends many years past then in some provisions. It’s hardly a clean break from EU regulations and bureaucracy.

If you don’t wish to read the 585 pages, there is a much shorter document, only 7 pages, that is an “Outline of the political declaration setting out the framework for the future relationship between the European Union and the United Kingdom” – available on the web. This spells out that the intention is to ensure close adherence by the UK to EU policies on customs and product regulations, on state aid policies, on financial services regulations, on intellectual property rules, on transport regulations, and many other areas. The draft agreement itself also ensures compliance on such matters as state aid and environmental policies. Just one example of this is the fudge over fishing in our future territorial waters where we should have control but will not – rules on that have to be agreed with the EU.

The claim by Government Ministers is that the agreement ensures there will be no disruption in the free movement of goods, thus protecting our industries, and it will enable us to regain control of our borders and the movement of people. But in reality we will still be subject to EU regulations in many areas, and some in perpetuity it seems.

The Irish border problem and the proposed solution is a complete fudge. I respect the desire of the Irish to ensure no hard border between North and Southern Ireland – as there has not been ever since we were both part of the EU and the 1998 Agreement to promote the peace process – but the basic problem is that Northern Irish politicians wish to have their cake and eat it. They want to remain full members of the United Kingdom which all that entails in terms of no customs barriers within but some at the borders and conformance to UK regulations while retaining free movement with southern Ireland.

Even though the proposal for what is effectively a “customs union” embodied in the agreement may be attractive to business, it effectively cedes control to the EU of what goods are permitted to be traded within the UK. At least that’s the way I read it. The EU has taken great care to ensure there is no “unfair competition” from the UK after Brexit by binding us to EU rule conformance.

Let’s just take one example which is the recent GDPR regulation enacted by the EU. Under Article 71 of the agreement. The United Kingdom is binding itself to “ensure a level of protection of personal data essentially equivalent to that under Union law” in perpetuity. So the EU could invent even more daft regulations than the current GDPR ones and the UK would have to adopt them with no say in the matter.

Another example is the issue of Competition Law and State Aid. New state aid in the UK can be challenged by the EU up to 4 years after the transition period (see Article 93). Is that a trivial matter? Hardly because for example the European Court of Justice (ECJ) just issued a judgement stopping the UK from paying for power plants to stay open so as to provide emergency power when required. This was providing certainty of supply and minimising price peaks in severe weather conditions. The ECJ can also interfere in interpretation of the agreement for 8 years after the transition period (see Article 158).

In summary the withdrawal agreement is far from being a “declaration of independence” for the UK as Brexit supporters wanted. It will not enable us to set our own rules and regulations on social policies, labour regulations or environmental standards. In effect it’s a Brexit in name only.

Surely it would be much better to have cut out this bureaucracy and save a lot of the money we have promised to pay the EU under the withdrawal agreement by pushing for a clean break followed by a free trade agreement with the EU. That is what the Leave-means-leave campaign (see https://www.leavemeansleave.eu/ ) are pushing for and that makes more sense to me also than accepting this very poor deal negotiated by weak politicians. This hardly seems to be the best deal that could have been negotiated as the Prime Minister is claiming.

Postscript: After writing the above I read this morning’s Financial Times. It seems their writers agree with me in an article headlined “Accord leaves Britain bound to Brussels”. It not just points out the problems in the “transition period” but on such matters as “state aid” where it says “the UK authority must take ‘utmost account’ of commission advice on all decisions, and can be overruled by Brussels or the ECJ”. Similarly their writer Philip Stephens headlines an article with “Parliament should reject a rotten deal”. Looks like the FT journalists may have actually read the agreement also. I certainly agree with Mr Stephens.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

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ShareSoc Seminar, new Patisserie CEO and Brexit

I attended the ShareSoc AGM and Company Presentations Seminar last night. The AGM was routine but a couple of points are worth noting: 1) Total membership increased to almost 4,000 in 2017 and I gather it has increased further since – partly from the Beaufort campaign; 2) Lord Lee, a well-known writer for the FT on small cap stocks, has become “Patron”. Anyone reading this who has not yet become a full, subscribing Member of ShareSoc should do so because they do an enormous amount of good work for investors.

As regards the company presentations, here is some brief coverage of the first three:

Ilika (IKA): This company produces solid-state batteries which have advantages over other battery types for certain applications. I first saw this company present to investors a couple of years ago. Revenue is creeping up but losses still exceed revenue. As last time, there seem to be some business opportunities but major revenue growth and profits do not appear to be likely in the short term. They might have interesting technology but can they sell it at a profit and in volume? Until they can prove this, I don’t think it’s a company in which I will consider investing.

Pelatro (PTRO): This company provides marketing software to telecoms companies. The company was only incorporated in January 2017 and listed on AIM in December of that year. They did a placing to raise more funds in August 2017. It’s clearly early days yet but revenue is forecast to grow rapidly. The CEO was a glib and fast talker which somewhat put me off, but he did explain the business reasonably well. This is definitely one I will do more research on. The AIM prospectus is of course available on their web site which is always worth reading for newish listings. However, attempting to print their last Annual Report caused Internet Explorer to hang twice, which is somewhat annoying.

Forbidden Technologies (FBT): This company provides technology to edit and manage videos using a proprietary codec. At least that is so far as I could understand it. The company has been listed on AIM for years but has been consistently loss making and revenue last year was still less than £1 million. There were a couple of existing disgruntled shareholders in the audience. The company came across as having some interesting technology but no very clear focus on who they were going to sell it to, what the USP was, what the competitors are, etc. Was it to be sold to major platform operators, or consumers? Looks like a typical company founded by technologists who don’t have strengths in sales and marketing – a very typical UK story. I could not see that the outlook will change because the presenters could not even sell the company to investors.

Perhaps I am being harsh on Ilika and Forbidden Technologies. But technology companies and their managers do need to learn that there is more to business than having a good idea and some bright technical staff.

The interesting news today was that Patisserie Holdings (CAKE) CEO Paul May has departed and a new CEO with a CV as long as your arm on “turnarounds” has been appointed with immediate effect. It’s hardly surprising that Paul May has left. The previous CFO went promptly after the alleged fraud was discovered but internal systems seem to have been very lax with the CEO not knowing about winding-up petitions and bank overdrafts. I hope he will be returning the bonus shares he obtained based on the false accounts.

Incidentally there will be a discussion on Patisserie at the Mello London event run by David Stredder on the 26th November – see http://melloevents.com/mello-london/ . The Mello events are always interesting for investors in small cap companies.

Brexit

One reader of my blog suggested that politics was off topic for this blog and I should stick to investment matters. But the blog does cover wider issues occasionally including economics, politics, corporate governance, management, transport, art, London events and other issues. Yes I do have a very broad range of interests! But Brexit is so key to the future financial health of the UK economy, and hence to investors in it, that it would be remiss not to cover it to some degree. No doubt that it is the reason why the Financial Times goes on about it endlessly.

Now I think the best comment on the current position was given in this tweet by my M.P., Bob Neill: “With all respect to some of my colleagues, pontificating about the draft deal Theresa May has secured before they have even read the text does not do justice to the seriousness of the issues at stake. The country deserves better than that and any proposals deserve a fair hearing.

I am therefore going to defer comments myself in detail until I have read the whole 585 pages of the draft withdrawal agreement and a couple of associated documents. You can find them here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/progress-on-the-uks-exit-from-and-future-relationship-with-the-european-union . I will also listen to what Mrs May has to say and other intelligent commentators before coming to any conclusions.

Although I am keen on many aspects of Brexit and hope it can be achieved without too much in the way of compromises, and with a practical solution, we certainly should not rush into any decision on the matter. This is not the time for emotion, or grandstanding.

Anyone who has read the whole 585 pages of the draft withdrawal agreement is welcome to post some comments on this blog of course. There’s a challenge for you!

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

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Restaurant Group Rights Issue and Brexit Gloom

Restaurant Group (RTN) have announced the terms of the rights issue that is required to even part finance their proposed acquisition of Wagamama. I made some somewhat negative comments on that deal in a previous blog post and the general media comment has likewise been negative.

The rights issue is to raise £315 million at a price per share of 108.5p which is a discount of 57% discount to the last trading day price. Net debt will also increase substantially and the current dividend will be very much reduced. The high dividend yield was one of the reasons investors might have bought the shares in the last year so they will be very disappointed.

Investors Champion suggested that investors might have been “stitched up” and that buying anything from private equity owners is a recipe for a poor outcome. All I know is that I am very wary about buying rights issues that are at a steep discount since I got suckered into buying shares in RBS back in 2008. It usually means that advisors have told the company that there is little appetite for the issue because it is perceived as risky, and hence nobody is going to take up the rights offer, or underwrite it, without a very big incentive.

The share price has been falling further today after the announcement and is down over 5% at the time of writing.

Brexit Gloom

The pound has been falling and so has my portfolio today despite the fact that a lower pound will help many of the companies I hold – but when markets are falling there is nowhere to hide. Apparently this is over concerns that Mrs May won’t be able to either agree a deal with the EU; or even if agreed, won’t be able to get it through her cabinet or Parliament. Cannon to the right of her, cannon to the left of her, cannon behind her, volley’s and thunder’d, stormed at with shot and shell … but still she pushed forward with the Chequers deal into the valley of death (to paraphrase Alfred Tennyson).

Personally I thought the Chequers proposal was a good basis for a deal with the EU but the Irish border issue is a likely deal breaker. Time for a rethink perhaps? But I don’t mean another referendum as I don’t believe the general public have any enthusiasm for another lengthy political campaign and there is little time for one.

The Financial Times (FT) had the usual negative Brexit stories today which is getting very tiresome. I would cancel my subscription if it was not for the occasional useful article they publish. With news short over the weekend I think the editor might be instructing his staff to produce articles to fill the space on Monday focused on Brexit. This time it was how Brexit is weakening productivity growth, Ramsgate being on standby for a crisis at Dover, immigration curbs that worry meat processors and an editorial focused on the “serious” Jo Johnson. Apparently meat processors employ more than 60% of staff who come from the EU. I am not scared.

Will we run out of fried chicken or beef-burgers? Probably not because as the article points out some of the tasks can be automated. They clearly have not been to date because cheap foreign labour makes it uneconomic. My conclusion is that Brexit will improve productivity enormously to the benefit of the economy and help those low-paid workers whose wages have been depressed by immigration.

But there was one interesting article in the FT today. That was about the popularity of “proxy resignation services” in Japan. These are organisations that will take on the task of telling your boss you have quit if you are too embarrassed to do so. Fed up with your company, your work or the bullying boss. Just call “Exit” to give your notice on the required date and they handle it from then on. No need to even face your colleagues or be accused of being a quitter.

This is simply the reverse of the amusing George Clooney film “Up in the Air” where he ran an outplacement service for companies, i.e. took on the task of firing people in a way that avoided difficult conversations.

There should be a market for such services in the UK, but perhaps it should be extended to helping you dump your girlfriends or wives? So much better than having emotional confrontations. So there’s an idea to pursue for some entrepreneurial web developer. Even Mrs May’s cabinet might find such a service useful in the next few weeks.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

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Brexit Prevarication, The Company, Sarbanes-Oxley and Patisserie Holdings (CAKE)

Prevarication definitions: delaying giving someone an answer, or avoiding telling the whole truth. Theresa May’s suggestion for an extension of the Brexit transition period surely smacks of prevarication and all sides of the Brexit debate saw it for what it was. The result is some furious back-peddling by the Prime Minister. Putting off decisions usually does not make them any easier. It is not at all clear what the PM’s strategy is here. Was she perhaps hoping to put off Brexit negotiations until after the next election when she might have a bigger majority and will not have to rely on the DUP? As the EU has been saying, she needs to spell out what arrangements the UK wants and preferably ones that are likely to be acceptable to the EU – otherwise gear up now for a hard Brexit.

One of the problems with a hard Brexit would be the likely tariff barriers to both exports and imports. The economy might quickly adapt to those but it was interesting reading a book named “The Company” by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge – I am doing some research on the way joint stock companies developed to see how we got to where we are, which the book covers well. One interesting paragraph covers what happened after the first world war when protectionism rose and the US and UK introduced tariff barriers on certain goods. That is why Ford and GM set up car plants in the UK which was a strategy to get around those barriers. So if we have a hard Brexit, we might see the same response – UK companies will set up European subsidiaries and vice-versa. Smart businessmen are experts at getting around political problems!

The book “The Company” is highly recommended as an easy read on the development of companies, but it is not very complimentary about the amateur UK management in comparison with the professional managers of big US, German, Japanese, etc, companies. Competent and well-trained professional management seems to be a lot more important than particular legal or corporate governance structures.

Another section of the book covers the debacles of Enron and Worldcom which were massive frauds hidden by defective auditing (which also caused the collapse of Anderson) after which a new Act was passed in the USA – the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. This required not just rotation of audit partners, but to quote from the book: “The law also requires CEOs and chief financial officers to certify the accuracy of their financial reports, and it creates a new crime of securities fraud, making it punishable by up to twenty-five years in jail”. It also enabled claw-backs of executive compensation for misconduct.

Although there has been some criticism of Sarbanes-Oxley in the USA for adding onerous obligations on companies, and hence adding to costs, perhaps that was a result of the way it was implemented that was over-zealous. But surely it is this kind of legislation that is required in the UK if we are to clean up the financial reporting and auditing of companies after so many recent failures. Making the publishing of false accounts a criminal offence with severe penalties would be a good starting point.

One such recent example is of course the small company Patisserie Holdings. There was an interesting article in Shares Magazine this week where the Editor pointed out that the case was similar to that of Tesco. In 2017 the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) forced that company to compensate certain shareholders for publishing false accounts on which basis they had invested. See https://www.fca.org.uk/publication/final-notices/tesco-2017.pdf for the FCA Notice on the matter. This decision was based on the fact that it was considered to be market abuse to make false announcements, and hence a false market was created. Although Patisserie is an AIM company, it is probably covered by the same market abuse regulations. So this issue might be a question for the General Meeting of Patisserie on the 1st November. Will Patisserie need to provide for such financial compensation before the FCA forces them to, which could be substantial if the alleged financial fraud had been going on for many months? The answer might not just interest past investors but those who are purchasing shares in the placings.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

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AIC Calls for KIDs to be Suspended

The Association of Investment Companies (AIC) have called for KIDs to be suspended. KIDs are those documents devised by the EU that were aimed at giving basic information on investment funds – and that includes investment trusts which the AIC represents.

It was a typical piece of badly implemented EU regulation even if the motive was worthy. But KIDs give a very misleading view of likely returns from investment funds. Whoever designed the performance rating system clearly had little experience of financial markets, and neither did they try it out to see what the results would be in practice. Similarly, if they had bothered to consult the AIC or other bodies representing collective funds, or experienced investors as represented by ShareSoc, they would have realised how misleading the results might be.

It also imposes costs on investment managers and on brokers who have to ensure their clients have read the KID before investing – even if they are already holding the fund/shares or have invested in it previously. This means for on-line brokers we now get a tick box that we have to click on which is simply tedious. I just click on them automatically because if I intend to buy an investment trust there is a great deal of information available elsewhere in the UK and the KID does not add anything of use in my opinion.

I think KIDs should be scrapped rather than just suspended. They serve little useful purpose and just add a costly bureaucratic overhead. This is the kind of nonsense that Brexit supporters are keen to get rid off when we do finally get out of the EU monster. But will we if Mrs May gets her way?

The AIC press release is here if you want more information: https://www.theaic.co.uk/aic/news/press-releases/aic-calls-for-kids-to-be-suspended

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

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Brexit, Abcam, Victoria and the Beaufort Case

Another bad day for my portfolio yesterday after a week of bad days last week when I was on holiday. Some of the problems relate to the rise in the pound based on suggestions by Michel Barnier that there might actually be a settlement of Brexit along the lines proposed by Theresa May. This has hit all the companies with lots of exports and investment trusts with big holdings in dollar investments that comprise much of my portfolio. But a really big hit yesterday was Abcam (ABC).

Abcam issued their preliminary results yesterday morning. When I first read it, it seemed to be much as expected. Adjusted earnings per share up 27.1%, dividend up 17.1% and broker forecasts generally met. The share price promptly headed downhill and dropped as much as 32%, which is the kind of drop you see on a major profit warning, before recovering to a drop of 15.2% at the end of the day.

I re-read the announcement more than once without being able to identify any major issues or hidden messages that could explain this drop. The announcement did mention more investment in the Oracle ERP system, in a new office and other costs but those projects were already known about. Indeed I covered them in the last blog post I wrote about the previous Abcam AGM where I was somewhat critical of the rising costs (see https://roliscon.blog/2017/11/15/abcam-agm-cambridge-cognition-ultra-electronics-wey-education-and-idox/ ). The Oracle project is clearly over-budget and running behind schedule. A lot of these costs are being capitalised so they disappear from the “adjusted” figures.

The killer to the share price appears to have been comments from Peel Hunt that the extra costs will reduce adjusted earnings by 9% based on reduced margins. The preliminary results announcement did suggest that the adjusted EBITDA margin would likely be 36% as against the 37.8% that was actually reported for last year. Revenue growth of 11% is expected for the current year so even at the reduced margin that still means profits will grow by about 5%. That implies only a slight reduction in adjusted e.p.s. on my calculations which implies a prospective p/e of about 34. That may be acceptable for such a high-quality company with an enviable track record (which is why it is one of my larger holdings) but perhaps investors suddenly realised that the previous rating was too high and vulnerable to a change of sentiment. That realisation seems to be affecting many highly rated go-go growth stocks at present.

The excessive IT project costs are of concern but if the management considered that such investment (£33 million to date) was necessary I think I’ll take their word on it for the present. At least the implementation of the remaining modules is being done on a phased approach which suggests some consideration has been given to controlling the costs in the short term.

I attended the AGM of another of my holdings yesterday – Victoria (VCP). They manufacture flooring products such as carpets, tiles, underlay and also distribute synthetic flooring products (I think that means laminates etc). There was a big bust-up at this company back in 2012 in which I was involved. The company was loss making at the time but some major shareholders decided they wanted a change or management and lined up Geoff Wilding who is now Executive Chairman. After an argument over his generous remuneration scheme and several general meetings, it was finally settled. After meeting Geoff I decided he knew more about the carpet business and what was wrong with the company than the previous management and therefore backed him – a wise decision as it turned out. Since then, with aggressive use of debt, he has done a great job of expanding the business by acquisition and this has driven the share price up from 25p to 760p. Needless to say shareholders are happy, but there were only about half a dozen at the AGM in London.

I’ll cover some of the key questions raised, and the answers, in brief. I asked about the rise in administration costs. This arises from the acquisitions and investment in the management team apparently. I also questioned the high amortisation of acquisition intangibles which apparently relates to customer relationships capitalised but was assured this was not abnormal. This is one of those companies, a bit like Abcam, where the “adjusted” or “underlying” figures differ greatly to the “reported” numbers so one has to spend a lot of time trying to figure out what is happening. It can be easier to just look at the cash flow.

Incidentally the company still has a large amount of debt because that has been raised to finance acquisitions in addition to the use of equity placings. In response to another question it was stated that the policy is to maintain net debt to EBITDA at a ratio of no more than 2.5 to 3 times. But earnings accretion is an important factor.

Geoff spent a few minutes outlining his approach to acquisitions and their integration which was most revealing. He talked a lot of sense. He will never ever buy a failing company. He wants to buy good companies with enthusiastic management. Thereafter he acts as a coach and wants to avoid disrupting the culture. He said a lot of acquisitions fail as people try to change everything wholesale. One shareholder suggestion this was leading to a “rambling empire” but the CEO advised otherwise.

The impact of Brexit was raised, particularly as there is nothing in the Annual Report on the subject. Were there any contingency plans? Geoff replied that if it is messy it will help Victoria as a lot of carpet is made on the continent and a fall in sterling will also help. He suggested they have lower operational gearing than many people think but obviously they might be affected by changing customer confidence. The CEO said that Brexit is on his “opportunity list”, not his “problem list”.

A question arose about the level of short selling in the stock which seems to have driven down the share price of late. Geoff suggested this was a concerted effort by certain hedge funds but he was confident the share price will recover.

Clearly Geoff Wilding is a key person in this company so the question arose about his future ambitions. He expects to do 2, 3 or 4 acquisitions per year and life would be simpler if he didn’t do so many. He tends to live out of a suitcase at present. But he still hopes to be leading the company in 5 year’s time.

In summary this was a useful meeting and I wish I had purchased more shares years ago but was somewhat put off by the debt levels.

Lastly, there was a very interesting article by Mark Bentley on the Beaufort case in the latest ShareSoc newsletter (if you are not a member already, please join as it covers many important topics for private investors). It seems that the possible “shortfall” in assets was only 0.1% of the claimed assets with only three client accounts unreconciled. But administrators PWC and lawyers Linklaters are racking up millions of pounds in fees when the client assets could have been transferred to other brokers in no time at all and at minimal cost. An absolute disgrace in essence. Be sure you encourage the Government, via your M.P., to reform the relevant legislation to stop this kind of gravy train in future.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

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