Investor Meet Company, Fevertree, Closet Trackers, Politics and the Environment

I recently came across a company called “Investor Meet Company” (see https://www.investormeetcompany.com/ ). They claim to enable individual investors to meet with company directors over the internet, i.e. via a digital web cast. The service is free to investors but there is a small charge to companies who take part.

The company was formed in 2018 by two founders, Marc Downes and Paul Brotherhood, who seem to have lengthy financial backgrounds and the web site looks professional. However, their contract terms are over complex and their privacy policy likewise so I am not rushing to sign up. They also invite you to provide details of companies you are interested in, which may be your holdings, which is not ideal. But if any readers have experience of this service, please let me know.

I mentioned Fevertree (FEVR) in my last blog post and Phil Oakley’s review of the business. Today the company issued a trading statement which was positive – it mentions “acceleration in key growth markets of the US and Europe in the second half”, but UK performance seems to be mixed. Growth in the USA is now expected to be c. 34% which is ahead of previous expectations. But the overall revenue forecast of £266 to £268 million is less than the previous consensus brokers’ forecast. The share price is up 7.8% today though. I may have to look at this business again because US growth is key to the share valuation.

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) have fined Janus Henderson £1.9 million for running two funds as “closet trackers”, i.e. actually closely tracking an index while charging high fees that are more normal for actively managed funds. This apparently was particularly obnoxious because they did not tell the investors in the funds that they were switched to a passive approach in 2011. The funds affected were Henderson Japan Enhanced Equity and Henderson North American Enhanced Equity. Investors have been paid compensation. Investors in funds need to be very wary that the fund managers of actively managed funds are actually putting in the effort and not sitting back and being a pseudo index tracker while charging high fees.

I watched some of the debate last night between Johnson and Corbyn but as it was so trivial in content I turned it off fairly quickly. I can imagine a lot of people did. The programme producer and compere can be mostly blamed for allowing such bland questions to which one could guess the responses and allowing evasions and irrelevant interruptions. The format of the US presidential debates is so much better.

Rather surprisingly I received a flyer in the post yesterday from an organisation called “Tactical Vote”. If I go to their web site it advises me that the best choice for me is to vote Labour in the Bromley and Chislehurst Constituency. The flyer makes it clear that their agenda is to keep the Conservatives out! But I suspect that they won’t get far in my constituency as Bob Neil had a 10,000 majority last time. If anyone was to switch it might be more likely be to the Brexit Party or the Liberal Democrats but there is not even a Brexit candidate standing so far as I can see. I am all in favour of “tactical voting” in some constituencies but we really need reform of the political system so that we have better representation. A transferable second vote system as we have for London Mayor is relatively simple. Tactical Vote seem to be pursuing a false agenda though; they should call themselves the “Labour Vote Promoters”.

One of the hot political issues, at least so far as the minority parties are concerned as the major parties are more focused on Brexit, the NHS and give-aways in the current General Election is the environment, i.e. how we become carbon neutral by 2050 or a date of your choice. Even the Conservatives wish us all to be driving electric cars, changing our home heating system and changing our way of life in other ways to avoid disastrous climate change. There was an interesting article in today’s Financial Times showing how this is quite pointless because China will soon be emitting more carbon from burning coal than the whole of the EU. They are expanding the number of coal power stations and the result will be to offset global progress in reducing emissions. In 2017 China produced 27% of world CO2 emissions, while the UK produced 1.2%. China’s emissions have been rising while the UK’s are falling so any extreme efforts by the UK are not likely to have much impact on the world scene.

However if you want to save the world and cut your heating bills (the latter is a more practical objective) I suggest looking at product called Radbot from Vestemi. The company was founded by a long-standing business contact of mine. It’s basically an intelligent radiator valve that monitors when a room is occupied and adapts to your usage.

Apart from that point, I consider there is so much misinformation being spread around about climate change and the impact of CO2 emissions that it is impossible to comment on the subject intelligently enough to refute much of the nonsense in a short blog article. But I do think it might be helpful to reduce the population of the UK which is just getting too damn crowded and leading to housing shortages, congestion on the roads and in public transport and other ills. That would be a better way of reducing emissions.

Part of the problem is that the NHS has become very good at keeping people alive despite what some politicians believe, while immigration has boosted numbers as well. You can see this in the latest forecasts for London’s population which is likely to grow by 18% to 10.4 million by 2041. See https://data.london.gov.uk/dataset/projections-documentation for more details.

Those are the issues politicians should be talking about.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

You can “follow” this blog by clicking on the bottom right.

RNS Announcement Emails, Mello Presentation and NHS Politics

Many private investors like me have been using a service from Investegate to deliver new RNS announcements via email. But recently, and not for the first time, delivery of such announcements has been delayed, or they have not been delivered at all. This can be positively dangerous – for example I only realised that I had missed seeing one after the share price of a company I held rose sharply. Missing bad news can be even more traumatic.

After complaining to Investegate and getting no response I decided to change to another service. The London Stock Exchange offer a similar free service (see https://www.londonstockexchange.com under Email Alerts). It appears to work reliably so I recommend it.

Many readers will be aware of the Mello events that attract many private investors to company presentations and for networking. Mello London is a 2-day event in Chiswick on the 12th and 13th of November (see: https://melloevents.com/event/ ). I will be giving a talk on Business Perspective Investing based on my recently published book on the Tuesday at 12.55pm. So please come along and learn more about why financial analysis is not the most important aspect of selecting companies in which to invest.

I note that the NHS is likely to be a political football in the coming General Election. As a heavy user of the NHS for the last 30 years during which it has kept me alive, I consider this is a grave mistake. The NHS is not a perfect service and could do with some more money as the UK spends relatively less on healthcare in comparison with other countries. But the service has improved enormously over the last 30 years regardless of the political party or parties that were in power. One of the most damaging aspects has been constant change and reorganisation driven by political dictates and concerns to improve efficiency. It’s also been slow to adopt new technology such as IT software because it is so monolithic and bureaucratic a body. When it did commit to a major IT project for patient records and associated systems it wasted £10 billion or more on an ultimately abandoned project. More diversity and local decision making are needed in the NHS. But I see no chance of it being threatened by any trade deal with the USA or by our exit from the EU.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

You can “follow” this blog by clicking on the bottom right.

© Copyright. Disclaimer: Read the About page before relying on any information in this post.

Exchange Market Size in Stockopedia and BHP plus RIO

I noticed that the share prices of BHP Group (BHP) and Rio Tinto (RIO) jumped this morning – at least for these behemoths of the FTSE-100 they moved substantially at 2.8% and 3.4% respectively. I only noticed because I recently purchased some of the shares in each company.

These are of course very large mining companies so they are dependent on the price of metals and metal ore, particularly iron ore. The last time I looked at these companies was two or three years ago when they were laden down with debt and had poor returns on capital. But they have certainly had a change of heart since then and seem to be more focused on generating real profits and cash flow rather than building ever bigger holes in the ground. Debt has been cut substantially in both companies.

With the profits mainly coming from overseas, they are a good hedge against any form of Brexit, and yields are high for those who like dividends. I am not a great fan of commodity-based businesses where predicting future prices of the products is not easy and they typically go through boom and bust cycles as such companies all invest in new production capacity at the same time as prices go up. Soon after when all the new capacity comes on stream there is a bust of course. But I made a small exception in this case.

But why the share price jump this morning? Are investors moving from growth to value as other commentators have suggested? Have value shares such as BHP and RIO suddenly started to look attractive, as they did to me? Or has Nigel Farage’s impossible demands for a deal with the Conservatives to ensure Brexit over the weekend suddenly encouraged investors to look for Brexit hedges?

Stockopedia have released an updated version of their “New” software. It now includes the Exchange Market Size (EMS) which is a useful parameter to look at when trading in company shares, particularly smaller ones. Note that Exchange Market Size was previously called Normal Market Size.  It is the maximum size in terms of share trade volume at which a market maker is obligated to adhere to their quoted share prices. It is a very good indicator of the liquidity in the shares and how easy they will be to trade. When trading electronically on most retail platforms, this is a useful number to know as it will affect whether you can trade automatically, have to set a limit order or get a dealer to trade for you. In addition, any trade bigger than the EMS might be done at prices higher or lower than you expect.

This number can be very small for some AIM stocks. For example on Bango (BGO) which I hold it is currently only 3,000 shares (less than £4,000 in value) when the EMS for BHP and RIO is more equivalent to £20,000 in value.

The new Stockopedia software version has other improvements although I still seem to be having problems with the Stock Alerts feature that I use every day. Perhaps there are still some issues that have yet to be fixed but you can still revert to the old version.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

You can “follow” this blog by clicking on the bottom right.

© Copyright. Disclaimer: Read the About page before relying on any information in this post.

Woodford, Buffett Bot and FRC Survey

There was a very good article in the FT on Saturday on the “rise and fall of a rock star fund manager”, i.e. Neil Woodford. Essential reading for those who have lost money in his funds. A tale of hubris and obstinate conviction it seems. They report that lawyers are looking at a possible claim for investors but I cannot see any obvious grounds. But lawyers like to chase ambulances. Panorama are also covering the Woodford debacle on Monday.

That well-known phrase “Where are the customers’ yachts” comes to mind. While Woodford and his associates have made millions from his management company, the customers have lost money. That is an issue that the FCA might wish to consider but I cannot think of any immediate solution.

Another article in Saturday’s FT was on a Buffett “App” which would imitate the value investing style of Warren Buffett. Neil Woodford was once known as Britain’s answer to Buffett in the deadwood press but that is now being forgotten of course. This new App from Havelock London is aimed to imitate the investing style that is claimed to be the source of Buffett’s above average long-term performance.  They claim that App will focus on long-term value rather than short term performance which is the approach of most such “quant” investors. This was the marketing pitch of Woodford’s Patient Capital Trust in essence as you can tell from the name.

But in my view this whole approach that you can pick out sound investments by clever analysis of the historic financial numbers or of other metrics is simply misconceived. I have explained why this is so in my book “Business Perspective Investing (see https://www.roliscon.com/business-perspective-investing.html ). One reason why Buffett was so successful, which is obvious if you read about his career, is that he looked carefully at the business models of the companies in which he invested and such matters as the barriers to competitor entry. Yes you can cover some of his analysis by looking at return on capital or other metrics of a company, but that’s only half of the story. You need to understand the business from the perspective of a business analyst.

The Financial Report Council (FRC) have just published a survey on “The Future of Corporate Reporting” (see   https://www.frc.org.uk/news/october-2019/future-of-corporate-reporting-survey ). As the announcement says: “Respondents views will inform the FRC’s project which seeks to make recommendations for improvements to current regulation and practice and develop “blue sky” thinking. A key aim of the project is to challenge the FRC to think more broadly in responding to the recommendation by Sir John Kingman to promote greater “brevity, comprehensibility and usefulness in corporate reporting” moving forward”. So this is something all investors who read company reports should look at. It should take no more than 15 minutes to complete they assure us. I completed it in not much longer.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

Company Refs Acquired

Slater Investments and Stockopedia have issued a press release saying they have acquired the Company Refs financial analysis service. Company Refs was devised by Jim Slater, the father of the current Slater Investments Chairman and was originally published in paper form as a summary of all the key financial information on public companies on one page. It was later digitised but active marketing of the service has not taken place in recent years. But it was a truly innovative solution to help both professional and private investors when first devised.

Stockopedia provides a very similar service and the press release suggests that current REFS subscribers will be integrated into the Stockopedia service while Slater will use the financial database and intellectual property for internal research purposes.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

You can “follow” this blog by clicking on the bottom right.

© Copyright. Disclaimer: Read the About page before relying on any information in this post.

Goals Soccer Centres, Renishaw, Economic Forecasts, Politics and Portfolio Transfers

It’s Friday in August, the markets and the pound are falling, the Conservative Party have lost a bye-election meaning their majority in Parliament is vanishing, and the Governor of the Bank of England has forecast a shrinking economy as a result of Brexit. It’s gloom all around which explains the falling UK stock market today. But Mark Carney is only forecasting a 33% chance of a contraction in the UK economy in the first quarter of 2020, which means that there is a 67% chance it won’t and even then for only a short period of time. That’s assuming you have any confidence in Bank of England forecasts which are notoriously unreliable. The media are not exactly reporting matters in an unbiased way. Those who support Brexit are unlikely to be worried by such forecasts and they would probably accept a temporary disruption to the economy. Remaining or leaving the EU was never a primarily economic decision so far as Brexiteers were concerned – it’s about democracy and who makes our laws.

But there is certainly bad news for investors in Goals Soccer Centres (GOAL) who have reported that the defects in their accounting go back to at least 2010. The 2018 audit has had to be suspended, there is no time frame for producing the accounts and therefore the company is going to be delisted from AIM. This looks to be another example of defective audits – the past auditors were KPMG and BDO.

I have complained about the length of time it takes to switch portfolios between investment platforms in the past. The good news today is that I finally completed one. This latest one I have done has taken from the 23rd May to the 31st July, i.e. 70 days. And that’s one where it was a transfer of holdings in a personal crest account with Charles Stanley, after they raised their charges on such accounts, to another personal crest account with another provider which was already in existance. That should have been very simple as there were no fund holdings in the account – just all direct holdings on the register.

It is really quite unreasonable that account transfers should take so long and require so much effort, including numerous emails and letters to get it completed. It’s anti-competitive to allow such delays to continue.

Well at least that’s one simplification of my portfolios. I also sold out from Renishaw (RSW) yesterday after disappointing final results – revenue down 7% and below forecasts mainly as a result of alleged economic conditions in the Asia Pacific region. The share price is down another 5% this morning at the time of writing. This may be a fundamentally sound business with good products in essence but clearly investors like me are losing confidence that the company can justify its high p/e rating when growth is going into reverse.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

You can “follow” this blog by clicking on the bottom right.

© Copyright. Disclaimer: Read the About page before relying on any information in this post.

 

New Stockopedia Version and Abcam Trading Update

Like many private investors, I use the Stockopedia software to provide me with a summary of key financial information on a company. I also use it to provide “alerts” on price changes and for occasional stock screening. It’s one of the key elements in my share portfolio management. It has always been quick and easy to use, without too much complexity. They have just released a new version of the software that now supports mobile devices much better – that was certainly an issue with trying to use it previously on my mobile phone.

I have spent a few minutes trying the new version and reported quite a number of issues with it to Stockopedia support. Here’s a few of the key ones:

  • Portfolio holdings and alerts only show 40 stocks when my portfolio has many more than that, so cannot easily scroll up and down the whole portfolio.
  • Not supported on Internet Explorer which is still my default web browser.
  • Printing a stock page uses more pages – for example printing a report on Abcam now uses 5 sides in Chrome, i.e. 3 pages on a duplex printer instead of one page on Explorer with the old version. Print format screwed up also at top left. As with many new software versions, testing of print functions seems to have been limited.
  • Cost of holdings sometimes shows nil.

In general the testing of the new version seems to have been too little, even if I am very experienced at picking up bugs in software. As a result I won’t be switching to the new version just yet until they sort out some of these problems. However it is very easy to switch back and forwards between the versions. Let us hope they do not abandon the old version until all the problems are resolved.

On the subject of Abcam (ABC) yesterday the company issued a trading update for the year ending June. It looked fairly innocuous to me but the share price promptly fell sharply and finished the day down 13.3%. The only possible issue mentioned was the announcement that CFO Gavin Wood was stepping down “over the next year in order to continue his career closer to his family home”. He has been with the company for 3 years.

Did that justify the investor panic? Surely not. The FT commented that the company’s expansion plans had unsettled investors, but the announcement really only suggested a continuation of the growth strategy and formulation of plans to achieve that. Perhaps it was simply that investors had realised that a prospective p/e of 40 for the current year after a strong recent share price run was a bit too high. Or perhaps it’s that summer season problem where liquidity is low and hence share prices tend to be volatile. Anyway the share price is recovering today at the time of writing and my portfolio loss on Abcam yesterday was mostly offset by the rise in Learning Tecnologies (LTG) which issued a very positive trading update. It’s share price rose about 20% on the day.

Abcam is of course a producer and distributor of antibodies. On a personal note, last week I was injected with monoclonal antibody named Prolia from Amgen to control osteopenia. If I had looked at the side effects and user reports on the internet beforehand I might have chosen not to have it, but no concerns so far. Only costs about £1,000 per shot apparently for six months. No wonder the NHS needs more money.

Roger Lawson (Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerWLawson )

You can “follow” this blog by clicking on the bottom right.

© Copyright. Disclaimer: Read the About page before relying on any information in this post.